The Ramble - May 19, 2018

Discovering our Past

Our Story

Discovering our Past with the Ramble

Explore the homes that have shaped the history of Brevard over the last 150 years.

Brevard is filled with historic structures from houses to downtown commercial buildings. There are 18 buildings listed on the National Register of Historic places, along with two historic districts.

The Ramble tour will take you to some of those historic homes where you can explore, take a step back in time and imagine what it was like when these homes were first built.

May 19, 2018
12:00 p.m.—4:00 p.m.

Tickets: $15

Guests will also receive general information and a map
Tickets must be shown at each location.

For more information call: 828-884-2347

Advance tickets available at the Transylvania Heritage Museum
Museum hours are:
Wednesdays thru Saturdays
10am – 5pm
189 W. Main Street
Brevard, North Carolina

Silvermont
Tickets Sales begin at 11am day of event
364 East Main Street
Brevard, North Carolina

Lankford-Cleveland House

Built around 1858 by B.C. Lankford, this home is the oldest structure in the East Main Street National Historic District. Lankford was a community leader and early official for both Transylvania County and the Town of Brevard. Lankford, L.S. Gash and Alexander England donated 50 acres to establish the town.

Silvermont

Silvermont is named for Joseph Silversteen and his wife Elizabeth Mount. Silversteen was a leading industrialist who established the Toxaway Tanning Company in 1901 and owned other timber-related companies. The 1917 Colonial Revival style mansion includes thirty-three rooms with the main block of the house following a center-hall plan, two rooms deep. The Silversteen family moved from Rosman to Brevard in 1917, when construction of Silvermont was complete. Joseph Silversteen chose to build Silvermont in Brevard to get away from the hustle and bustle of Rosman. He wanted a quiet place in the country.

Cleveland-Kizer House

Built around 1910, this was home to Alex Kizer who was the county accountant during the 1920’s and exemplifies a group of houses built in and around Brevard that are distinguished by their pebbledash walls and contrasting brick corners.

Hemlock Hill/Brombacher House

This most unusual of Brevard’s stone houses was built as a summer home around 1940. The stonemasons were Brevard’s noted Wright brothers who started the house in their typical style. Mrs. Brombacher made them tear it down and start over again, declaring that she wanted the house to “look like it grew here” with no mortar showing and no square corners. The result was an Adirondack-type structure where the dark, jagged-edged stones appear to be randomly, vertically stacked without visible mortar.

Charles Orr House

Charles Edmond Orr, the original owner of this 1926 English Manorial Revival house, was postmaster of Brevard. The gray granite came from William Breese’s Cove Mill Quarry. The Wright brothers may have been the stonemasons for this house.

Galloway-Radford House (Grounds only)

Built by Thomas C. and Mary Belle Galloway between 1905 and 1910, the house is an excellent example of late-Victorian/Queen Anne form with Colonial Revival detailing typical of early twentieth century houses in the Brevard area. After Mr. Galloway’s death, Mary Belle and her new husband, Samuel Radford lived in the house and kept boarders. Following Mr. Radford’s death, the house was sold to Mr. Henry who was the Town Manager of Brevard.

Morrow Stone Cottage

Built in 1915, using the plans purchased from Gustav Stickley’s The Craftsman magazine, the house is built with load-bearing masonry on the first story. The stone was procured from the remains of the old Hume Hotel, located in the Dunn’s Rock vicinity, which burned during the Civil War. The Hume Hotel was the earliest known stone building in Transylvania County, and it is significant that its materials were reused for the oldest surviving stone house in the county.

The Red House

This house was built in 1851 as a trading post for Leander Sams Gash, one of the City of Brevard’s founders. During the Civil War trade with Charleston nearly ceased and the trading post became the Moore Hotel in 1861. It later served as a boarding house for Low Country visitors and is now a popular Bed and Breakfast.

Henry House

Built around 1858 by B.C. Lankford, this home is the oldest structure in the East Main Street National Historic District. Lankford was a community leader and early official for both Transylvania County and the Town of Brevard. Lankford, L.S. Gash and Alexander England donated 50 acres to establish the town.

Working Together

In Partnership with the Joint Historic Preservation Commission

Images from the Rowell Bosse North Carolina Room